Parlons science des affaires de la Cité (Politique quoi...)

Et sinon ben ça doit pouvoir se ranger là dedans.
Règles 
On va faire comme si on était des adultes responsables : soyez courtois ou assumez que votre interlocuteur vous réponde sur le même ton. Je jouerai à Zorro si il le faut mais j'aimerais autant éviter. Dans le même ordre d'idée : choisissez le forum approprié, utilisez un titre de sujet clair et évitez les doublons. Merci d'éviter le langage SMS et les messages rédigés intégralement en majuscules. Autant que faire se peut, écrire en français est à privilégier (sans se balancer le petit Robert à la gueule à la moindre faute mais en gardant à l'esprit que le message est fait pour être lu et par conséquent qu'il doit être compréhensible par tous).

Parlons science des affaires de la Cité (Politique quoi...)

Contributionde FlyingTichoux le 1 août 2009, 17:16

“Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedy.”

Et pour ouvrir quoi de mieux qu'un peu de sécurité sociale je vous le demande ?

The Myth Of Free Market Health Care In America
Shikha Dalmia, 07.29.09, 12:00 AM EDT
Other Western countries offer no panacea for American woes.


ObamaCare is in retreat. That much was clear the moment the president started springing B-grade Hollywood references to "blue pills and red pills" in its defense during his news conference last week. But before ObamaCare can be beaten back decisively, its critics need to answer this question: How did his plan for a government takeover of roughly a fifth of the U.S. economy get this far in the first place?

The answer is not that Democrats have a lock on Washington right now--although they do. Nor that Republicans are intellectually bereft--although they are. The answer is that both ObamaCare's supporters and opponents believe that--unlike Europe--America has something called a free market health care system. So long as this myth holds sway, it will be exceedingly difficult to prescribe free market fixes to America's health care woes--or, conversely, end the lure of big government remedies.

The fact of the matter is that America's health care system is like a free market in the same way that Madonna is like a virgin--i.e. in fiction only. If anything, the U.S. system has many more similarities than differences with France and Germany. The only big outlier among European nations is England, which, even in a post-communist world, has managed the impressive feat of hanging on to a socialized, single-payer model. This means that the U.K. government doesn't just pays for medical services but actually owns and operates the hospitals that provide them. English doctors are government employees!

But apart from England, most European countries have a public-private blend, not unlike what we have in the U.S.

The major difference between America and Europe of course is that America does not guarantee universal health insurance whereas Europe does. But this is not as big a deal as it might seem. Uncle Sam, along with state governments, still picks up nearly half of the country's $2.5 trillion annual health care tab.

More importantly, contrary to popular mythology, America does offer public care of sorts. It directly covers about a third of all Americans through Medicare (the public program for the elderly) and Medicaid (the public program for the poor). But it also indirectly covers the uninsured by--at least in part--paying for their emergency care. In effect, anyone in America who does not have private insurance is on the government dole in one way or another.

This is not radically different from France, where the government offers everyone basic public coverage, of course--but a whopping 90% of the French also buy supplemental private insurance to help pay for the 20% to 40% of their tab that the public plan doesn't cover.

Meanwhile, in Germany, about 12.5% of Germans who are civil employees or above a certain income opt out of the public system altogether and rely solely on private coverage--even though they know it is well nigh impossible to return to the public system once they switch. And more Germans likely would go private if they were not legally banned from doing so.

The most striking similarity between America, France and Germany, however, is the model of "insurance" upon which their health care systems are based. In other insurance markets, the more coverage you want, the more you have to pay for it. Consider auto insurance, for instance. If you want everything--from oil changes to collision protection--you'd have to pay more than someone who wants just basic collision protection. That's not how it works in health care.

For the same flat fee--regardless of whether it is paid for primarily through taxes as in France in Germany or through lost wages as in America--patients in all three countries effectively get an ATM card on which they can expense everything (barring co-pays) regardless of what the final tab adds up to. (Catastrophic coverage plans are available in America, but the market is extremely limited for a number of reasons, including the fact that most states have issued Patients Bill of Rights mandating all kinds of fancy benefits even in basic plans.)

Thus, in neither country do patients have much incentive to restrain consumption or shop for cheaper providers. In America and Germany, patients don't even know how much most medical services cost. In France, patients know the prices because they have to pay up front and get reimbursed by their insurer later--a lame attempt to ensure some price consciousness. But since there is no cap on the reimbursed amount, the French sometimes shop for doctors based on such things as office decor rather than prices, according to a study by David Green and Benedict Irvine, researchers at Civitas, a London-based think tank. (Green and Irvine reported this as a good thing.)

So what are the consequences of this "insurance" model and how are the three countries coping with it?

America, as Obama continuously reminds us, spends 16% of its gross domestic product on health care--the highest percentage in the world. If current trends persist, in 75 years health care will consume about 50% of the GDP--and all of the federal budget. But France is not doing a whole lot better. Its health care system is the third most expensive in the world with over 11% of its GDP going toward health care--nearly three times more than the amount in 1960. The French fork over more than 20% of their income in taxes for public coverage (and another 2.5% to purchase supplemental private coverage)--yet their public program suffers from chronic deficits. Germany, similarly, spends about 11% of its GDP on health care with Germans contributing more than 15% of their income toward buying health care.

If France and Germany are not spending even more on health care, one big reason is rationing. Universal health care advocates pretend that there is no rationing in France and Germany because these countries don't have long waiting lines for MRIs, surgical procedures and other medical services as in England and Canada. And patients have more or less unrestricted access to specialists.

But it is unclear how long this will last. Struggling with exploding costs, the French government has tried several times--only to back off in the face of a public outcry--to prod doctors into using only standardized treatments. In 1994, it started imposing fines of up to roughly $4,000 on doctors who deviated from "mandatory practice guidelines." It switched from this "sticks" to a "carrots" approach four years later, and tried handing bonuses to doctors who adhered to the guidelines.

Meanwhile, in Germany, "sickness funds"--the equivalent of insurance companies--have imposed strict budgets on doctors for prescription drugs. Doctors who exceed their cap are simply denied reimbursement, something that forces them to prescribe less effective invasive procedures for problems that would have been better treated with drugs. But the most potent form of rationing in France and Germany--and indeed much of Europe–is not overt, but covert: delayed access to cutting-edge drugs and therapies that become available to American patients years in advance.

The point is that there is no health care model, whether privately or publicly financed, that can offer unlimited access to medical services while containing costs. Ultimately, such a model arrives at a cross roads where it has to either limit access in an arbitrary way, or face uncontrolled cost increases. France and Germany, which are mostly publicly funded, are increasingly marching down the first road. America, which is half publicly and half privately funded, has so far taken the second path. Should America offer even more people such unlimited access through universal coverage, it too will end up rationing care or facing national bankruptcy.

The only sustainable system that avoids this Hobson's choice is one that is based on a genuine free market in which there is some connection between what patients pay for coverage and the services they receive. That is emphatically not what America or any Western country has today. Looking to these countries for solutions as Obama and other advocates of universal health coverage are doing will lead to false diagnoses and false cures.

Shikha Dalmia is a senior analyst at Reason Foundation and writes a biweekly column for Forbes.


le texte était initialement publié ici : http://www.forbes.com/2009/07/28/health-care-reform-obama-opinions-columnists-shikha-dalmia.html


Et puis j'ai ce petit site sous la main qui compare les différent systèmes de santé de part le monde : http://healthcare-economist.com/2008/04/14/health-care-around-the-world-an-introduction/

(Ce topic n'est pris en charge ni par l'Assurance Maladie, ni par votre mutuelle)
Les civilisations sont l’écho de ces rares instants où l’homme n’assume que ce qu’il se sent prêt à assumer éternellement.
Avatar
FlyingTichoux
Site Admin
 
Contributions : 3364
Inscription : 30 juil 2009, 21:29

Du biff du-du-du biiiiiiiiiff

Contributionde FlyingTichoux le 7 août 2009, 14:13

BNP Paribas s'apprêterait à verser un milliard d'euros de bonus à ses traders : cette « révélation » de Libération agite le web. L'histoire est loin d'être aussi simple. Dans leur empressement à taper sur les banquiers, les médias ont oublié quelques faits. Non seulement la BNP ne va pas forcément verser un milliard de bonus, mais son attitude va précisément dans le sens d'une « moralisation » de la finance.

Texte complet assez intéressant
Les civilisations sont l’écho de ces rares instants où l’homme n’assume que ce qu’il se sent prêt à assumer éternellement.
Avatar
FlyingTichoux
Site Admin
 
Contributions : 3364
Inscription : 30 juil 2009, 21:29

Re: Parlons science des affaires de la Cité (Politique quoi.

Contributionde Reda le 9 août 2009, 14:37

Ce qu'il y a de bien en France, c'est qu'on se rapproche du système de santé actuelle des Etats Unis mais pas comme eux le font, ici c'est par coups de putes (tu vises une cible facile, genre les médecins qui ne sont que des nantis, et tu détourne l'attention : loi des Hopitaux, volonté de déconventionnaliser...). LOL.
Avatar
Reda
Chû Totoro
 
Contributions : 2646
Inscription : 4 août 2009, 14:53

De toute façon, la sécurité sociale en soi...

Contributionde FlyingTichoux le 9 août 2009, 18:11

Reda écrit:Ce qu'il y a de bien en France, c'est qu'on se rapproche du système de santé actuelle des Etats Unis mais pas comme eux le font, ici c'est par coups de putes (tu vises une cible facile, genre les médecins qui ne sont que des nantis, et tu détourne l'attention : loi des Hopitaux, volonté de déconventionnaliser...). LOL.


Dommage que personne dans nos gouvernements successifs n'ait pensé à jeter un oeil sur le système de santé suisse - stable tout en étant largement privé, avec une couverture minimum comparable à celle de la France et l'un des système de soin les plus enviés de la planète. Evidemment si ça implique d'avoir l'efficacité administrative suisse pour aller avec, on est déjà grillés.
Les civilisations sont l’écho de ces rares instants où l’homme n’assume que ce qu’il se sent prêt à assumer éternellement.
Avatar
FlyingTichoux
Site Admin
 
Contributions : 3364
Inscription : 30 juil 2009, 21:29

Re: Parlons science des affaires de la Cité (Politique quoi.

Contributionde Reda le 9 août 2009, 19:46

Les suisses ? Mais ça va pas non leurs médecins suicident les gens ! :D
Nan nan, nous, en France on règle les problèmes du trou de la sécu en baissant le numerus clausus. Bah oui, moins de medecins = moins de malades = moins de dépenses ! Non ? Comment ça non ?
Avatar
Reda
Chû Totoro
 
Contributions : 2646
Inscription : 4 août 2009, 14:53

Comme quoi y a pas que le forfait fiscal...

Contributionde FlyingTichoux le 9 août 2009, 19:55

Reda écrit:Les suisses ? Mais ça va pas non leurs médecins suicident les gens ! :D


Et une dizaine de français passent la frontière chaque année, justement parce que l'aide au suicide médicalement assisté n'y est pas pénalisée.
Les civilisations sont l’écho de ces rares instants où l’homme n’assume que ce qu’il se sent prêt à assumer éternellement.
Avatar
FlyingTichoux
Site Admin
 
Contributions : 3364
Inscription : 30 juil 2009, 21:29

Re: Comme quoi y a pas que le forfait fiscal...

Contributionde Reda le 9 août 2009, 23:18

FlyingTichoux écrit:
Reda écrit:Les suisses ? Mais ça va pas non leurs médecins suicident les gens ! :D


Et une dizaine de français passent la frontière chaque année, justement parce que l'aide au suicide médicalement assisté n'y est pas pénalisée.

C'est bizarre cette frilosité sur le sujet vu la tripotée d'éthiciens de renom français.

(J'ai eu l'opportunité de continuer mes études en Suisse mais je l'ai pas fait par
peur du changement, je sens que je vais le regretter pas mal)


oulah 27 posts faut que je slowdown !!!
Avatar
Reda
Chû Totoro
 
Contributions : 2646
Inscription : 4 août 2009, 14:53

Le ton du doc est insupportable par contre

Contributionde FlyingTichoux le 10 août 2009, 21:28

Si vous avez vu Sicko, ça c'est la version vue de l'autre côté du miroir (ABC, la chaîne US qui diffuse ce truc, est la propriété de Walt Disney Company et je pense qu'on peut lui coller l'étiquette pro-conservateurs sans avoir à se forcer)

Les civilisations sont l’écho de ces rares instants où l’homme n’assume que ce qu’il se sent prêt à assumer éternellement.
Avatar
FlyingTichoux
Site Admin
 
Contributions : 3364
Inscription : 30 juil 2009, 21:29

Il y a pas de smiley George Lucas :( ?

Contributionde lord-of-babylon le 10 août 2009, 23:21

Impossible à mater. Le mec on dirait Ben Stiller avec une moustache
Image


Clear Eyes, Full Heart. Can't Lose
Avatar
lord-of-babylon
Chibi Totoro
 
Contributions : 276
Inscription : 1 août 2009, 20:02

Re: De toute façon, la sécurité sociale en soi...

Contributionde Christian le 11 août 2009, 09:23

FlyingTichoux écrit:
Reda écrit:Ce qu'il y a de bien en France, c'est qu'on se rapproche du système de santé actuelle des Etats Unis mais pas comme eux le font, ici c'est par coups de putes (tu vises une cible facile, genre les médecins qui ne sont que des nantis, et tu détourne l'attention : loi des Hopitaux, volonté de déconventionnaliser...). LOL.


Dommage que personne dans nos gouvernements successifs n'ait pensé à jeter un oeil sur le système de santé suisse - stable tout en étant largement privé, avec une couverture minimum comparable à celle de la France et l'un des système de soin les plus enviés de la planète. Evidemment si ça implique d'avoir l'efficacité administrative suisse pour aller avec, on est déjà grillés.


Les dépenses de santé en suisse restent encore majoritairement publiques (58,5% sont faites par le public et 41,5% par le privé).

Par ailleurs difficile de comparer le système de santé Suisse à celui de la France parce que d'un part le PIB par habitant en Suisse est juste 56% supérieur à celui de la France (ca aide), et d'autre part les efficacités administratives sont difficilement comparables du fait de la différences de tailles des 2 pays (gérer le système de santé de 7M d'habitants, c'est plus simple que de gérer celui de 65 M d'habitants).

amha
Avatar
Christian
Chû Totoro
 
Contributions : 2170
Inscription : 9 août 2009, 15:38

Suivant

Retour à Divers


Qui est en ligne ?

Sur ce forum : Aucun membre inscrit et un visiteur